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Classroom Strategies for Helping A Dyslexic Student – Part 1

Classroom Strategies for Helping A Dyslexic Student – Part 1



January 3, 2016

In a recent article, Could Some of Your Students Be Dyslexic?, published in this newsletter, I raised the possibility that some of our students could be dyslexic. The article pointed out that the incidence of dyslexia could be as high as about 20% among female, Emirati, college students (Aboudan, Eapen, Bayshak, Al-Mansouri, & Al-Shamsi, 2011).

 

In this article, the first in a two part series, I would like to present several general classroom strategies, and several reading classroom strategies that I believe you could use to help dyslexic students in your class succeed academically.

 

dyslexia writing2

General Classroom Strategies

• Check that the student correctly writes down exactly what is required (homework, tests).

• Seat the student fairly close to the class teacher.

• Break tasks down into small easily remembered pieces of information.

• If visual memory is poor, copying must be kept to a minimum. Notes or handouts are far more useful.

 

Reading Classroom Strategies

• Save the dyslexic student the ordeal of having to ‘read aloud in class’. Reserve this for a quiet time with the class teacher.

• Alternatively, perhaps, give the student advanced time to read pre-selected reading material, to be practiced at home the day before. This will help ensure that the student is seen to be able to read out loud, along with other students.

 

The second and final article in this series will present classroom strategies for helping dyslexic students with their handwriting and spelling. Finally, always keep your supervisor and the counseling team at your college fully informed regarding any students in your class you may think are dyslexic.

 

References
Aboudan, R., Eapen, V., Bayshak, M., Al-Mansouri, M., & Al-Shamsi, M. (2011). Dyslexia in the United Arab Emirates University – A study of prevalence in English and Arabic. International Journal of English Linguistics, Vol 1, (2). Canadian Center of Science and Education. Retrieved from: http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ijel/article/view/10693

January 3, 2016
Teaching & Learning